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Boris hears first-hand what UK wine industry needs from Brexit


Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson MP toured the UK headquarters of the world’s largest family owned wine producer to find out how Brexit will impact the wine trade.

The visit to E&J Gallo’s offices in Uxbridge was organised by the Wine and Spirit Trade Association to help Mr Johnson understand the central role the UK plays in the global wine industry.

The MP for Uxbridge and South Ruislip was shown around Gallo’s offices in his constituency from where it has been operating for over 25 years.

Gallo is a family owned US wine company which produces and distributes wines across the world. 

Wine from Gallo’s Californian vineyards is sent in both bottle and bulk to the UK. The majority of which is sold in the UK and the rest re-exported across Europe and beyond. 

Gallo’s UK operation is a great example of how wine producing countries use the UK as a hub for international trade. By visiting Gallo, the Foreign Secretary could see how important the UK is in the worldwide wine trade and how much it relies on a balance of imports and exports.  

The UK wine industry sits second as the largest global importer by value and volume (behind USA and Germany respectively).

Despite being predominantly imported; the UK wine industry supports over 270 thousand jobs.

Over 99% of wine consumed in the UK is imported and just under 60% of wine, by volume, imported into the UK comes from outside the EU, two thirds of which is bottled in the UK.

The UK boasts Europe’s biggest wine bottling plant in Avonmouth. It is also home to bottling plants along the Manchester Ship Canal and in Norfolk, these are just a few examples of how the UK wine industry boosts local employment. 

In duty alone, the UK wine industry contributes £9.1billion to the public purse.

Chief Executive of the Wine and Spirit Trade Association, Miles Beale, said:

“Our message to government is to take the opportunity post Brexit to enhance trade by removing all unnecessary regulatory barriers and allow goods to flow more freely between the markets. It was great to have an opportunity to impress upon the Foreign Secretary, Boris Johnson, how essential it is that when we leave the EU we have agreements in place which maintain existing trade flows. Britain needs to hold onto its position as the international hub in the world wine trade to further boost the UK economy and provide more jobs.”

Rt. Hon. Boris Johnson MP said: 

“It’s been fantastic to visit another international business that has chosen to locate in Uxbridge and South Ruislip. After 25 years in Uxbridge, E&J Gallo is an important part of the commu-nity and local employer. I was fascinated to learn of their involvement along the whole supply chain, even owning sand mines to make their own bottles!”

Paul Sorrentino, VP and general manager at E&J Gallo Winery, said:

 “It was a pleasure to have Boris Johnson come visit our office.  Our EMEA office is based in Uxbridge and has been for many years, so it was a real delight for the team to meet our local MP.”

Theresa May addressed the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, last month where she told delegates that the “UK will continue to be a global advocate of free trade”.

The WSTA visit to Gallo was arranged to show the Foreign Secretary first-hand how the UK wine industry would greatly benefit from the PM’s commitment to securing free trade agreements.

Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson MP toured the UK headquarters of the world’s largest family owned wine producer to find out how Brexit will impact the wine trade.

The visit to E&J Gallo’s offices in Uxbridge was organised by the Wine and Spirit Trade Association to help Mr Johnson understand the central role the UK plays in the global wine industry.

The MP for Uxbridge and South Ruislip was shown around Gallo’s offices in his constituency from where it has been operating for over 25 years.

Gallo is a family owned US wine company which produces and distributes wines across the world.

Wine from Gallo’s Californian vineyards is sent in both bottle and bulk to the UK. The majority of which is sold in the UK and the rest re-exported across Europe and beyond.

Gallo’s UK operation is a great example of how wine producing countries use the UK as a hub for international trade. By visiting Gallo, the Foreign Secretary could see how important the UK is in the worldwide wine trade and how much it relies on a balance of imports and exports. 

The UK wine industry sits second as the largest global importer by value and volume (behind USA and Germany respectively).

Despite being predominantly imported; the UK wine industry supports over 270 thousand jobs.

 

Over 99% of wine consumed in the UK is imported and just under 60% of wine, by volume, imported into the UK comes from outside the EU, two thirds of which is bottled in the UK.

 

The UK boasts Europe’s biggest wine bottling plant in Avonmouth. It is also home to bottling plants along the Manchester Ship Canal and in Norfolk, these are just a few examples of how the UK wine industry boosts local employment.

 

In duty alone, the UK wine industry contributes £9.1billion to the public purse.


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